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Updated 2016 Top 100 Composite MLB Prospect List

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This is an update to our previous Top 100 composite as we added some more data to the composite from John Sickels' Top 175 list.

Scott Rovak-USA TODAY Sports

Who loves Top 100 prospect lists?! There are a lot of prospect lists out there these days, but readers still eat them up as they want to see their favorite prospects recognized. These lists also give us a sense of how good farm systems are across the league and to help us see who the names to watch are as we watch this game that we all love (although based on the team and/or the person, the level to which that love is healthy is certainly in question).

The concept behind this is very simple: I took 5 current Top 100 lists that are generally considered to be well-regarded (Baseball Prospectus, Baseball America, Keith Law, MLB Pipeline, Minor League Ball/John Sickels) and then made a composite list by assigning each player they ranked points and then adding them all together to get a player's raw score. Then, they were ranked to create a top 100 composite list.

The previous installment of this list did not include the rankings from Minor League Ball/John Sickels but now that his list is out (he created a top 175 prospect list with a bunch of realistic honorable mentions....seriously, Sickels is a mad man) I wanted to go ahead and put an update out there. Fangraphs still has yet to release its top 100 prospect list and frankly I have no idea when that will happen based on how their top 20 prospect lists by team have been coming out. Scout.com also released a top 100 list some time ago, but my spreadsheet was already made and macroed and whatnot so I haven't put it in there, although if I can find an easy fix to that without breaking the whole sheet I will add that one in as well.

My goal is to get a spreadsheet version with all of the rankings that people can fiddle with and make that available, but I have yet to find an easy way to do that. For those that are interested, Braves players are in bold italics.

  1. Corey Seager 500
  2. Byron Buxton 490
  3. Lucas Giolito 488
  4. Julio Urias 482
  5. Yoan Moncada 465
  6. JP Crawford 465
  7. Tyler Glasnow 462
  8. Alex Reyes 459
  9. Orlando Arcia 458
  10. Joey Gallo 454
  11. Dansby Swanson 435
  12. Blake Snell 431
  13. Nomar Mazara 430
  14. Trea Turner 424
  15. Steven Matz 421
  16. Rafael Devers 412
  17. Jose Berrios 406
  18. Austin Meadows 395
  19. Lewis Brinson 395
  20. Brendan Rodgers 384
  21. Andrew Benintendi 383
  22. Bradley Zimmer 378
  23. Franklin Barreto 376
  24. Alex Bregman 366
  25. Sean Newcomb 357
  26. Jose De Leon 356
  27. Robert Stephenson 352
  28. AJ Reed 336
  29. Gleyber Torres 335
  30. Tim Anderson 309
  31. Francis Martes 308
  32. Ozhaino Albies 306
  33. Anderson Espinoza 302
  34. Max Kepler 299
  35. Manuel Margot 287
  36. Nick Williams 283
  37. Raul Mondesi 283
  38. Clint Frazier 280
  39. Jesse Winkler 280
  40. Jon Gray 277
  41. Sean Manaea 270
  42. Aaron Blair 264
  43. Anthony Alford 263
  44. Cody Reed 262
  45. David Dahl 262
  46. Aaron Judge 262
  47. Brett Phillips 261
  48. Jorge Mateo 261
  49. Ryan McMahon 260
  50. Victor Robles 248
  51. Dillon Tate 247
  52. Josh Bell 243
  53. Brent Honeywell 227
  54. Javier Guerra 225
  55. Jorge Lopez 208
  56. Jeff Hoffman 207
  57. Willson Contreras 203
  58. Braden Shipley 200
  59. Gary Sanchez 196
  60. Michael Fulmer 186
  61. Jake Thompson 177
  62. Carson Fulmer 168
  63. Grant Holmes  163
  64. Dominic Smith 159
  65. Willy Adames 149
  66. Amir Garrett 148
  67. Kolby Allard 148
  68. Taylor Guerrieri 147
  69. Christian Arroyo 140
  70. Nick Gordon 140
  71. Luis Ortiz 136
  72. Amed Rosario 129
  73. Ian Happ 127
  74. Jose Peraza 124
  75. Jameson Taillon 111
  76. Kyle Tucker 109
  77. Kenta Maeda 105
  78. Archie Bradley 105
  79. Trent Clark 103
  80. Tyler Jay 102
  81. Hector Olivera 101
  82. Mark Appel 101
  83. Joe Musgrove 83
  84. Raimel Tapia 82
  85. Alex Verdugo 80
  86. Kevin Newman 78
  87. Mike Clevinger 73
  88. Jacob Nottingham 73
  89. Billy McKinney 72
  90. Kyle Zimmer 71
  91. Josh Hader 70
  92. Daz Cameron 69
  93. Bobby Bradley 68
  94. Hunter Harvey 60
  95. Cody Bellinger 56
  96. Jorge Alfaro 55
  97. Michael Feliz 50
  98. James Kaprelian 49
  99. Phil Bickford 48
  100. Kohl Stewart 48

The updates to this are very interesting given the effects that Sickels' list had on the rankings. Corey Seager is still unanimously the number one prospect in all of baseball, but Sickels was the first evaluator in the composite to not have Buxton at number 2 (he had Glasnow in that spot and had Buxton in 7th). He also had Dansby Swanson as the number 5 prospect in all of baseball, the highest Dansby has been ranked by any publication. Jose Berrios and Sean Manaea got healthy bumps from Sickels' ranking as well as well as several off-the-radar picks such as Michael Feliz and Mike Clevinger.

Okay, for you non-Braves fans out there, you are welcome to stop reading here.

...

Now that those losers (kidding!...kinda) are gone, here are the interesting Braves-related bits about the current version of the composite list. The Braves currently have 6 players in the composite top 100 including the very soon to graduate Hector Olivera despite the fact that he did only appeared on two lists total. Prospects that could easily gain top 100 consideration other than the above names includes Lucas Sims, Mike Soroka, and Ronald Acuna as well.

Other Braves that have been ranked by at least one of the lists but are not in the top 100 include Touki Toussaint, Austin Riley, and Max Fried. Within the next few weeks, prospects will be graduating at a high rate of speed from prospect lists and by midseason we will have a whole new set of prospect lists to consider. For now though, its nice to be able to look at an aggregate form of  the lists out there to get a general idea of what the industry consensus is about the prospects throughout the league.