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Breaking down the money in the Hector Olivera trade

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The Braves could get a bargain on the Cuban defector if he lives up to the hype.

Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

We now know how the finances shook out in the blockbuster deal that sent Hector Olivera and others to the Braves.

Money was a big reason why John Hart made the trade last week. The Braves were very interested in the Cuban star last winter, but the Dodgers came in and blew their top offer away, signing him for $62 million.

For the cost of Wood, Peraza, Johnson, Avilan and Arroyo, Atlanta will get five years of Olivera for nearly half the cost.

According to the AP, the Braves will send the Dodgers $7.45 million in December. That money will essentially go towards covering Bronson Arroyo's contract buyout of $4.5 million for 2016 and $8.5 million of Olivera's $28 million signing bonus, which is due by Dec. 31, 2015. Los Angeles is on the hook for Olivera's entire bonus and already paid him approximately $1.2 million this year.

It was originally unknown how much money Atlanta would save by unloading Arroyo – who was brought over to get Touki Toussaint – but it doesn't appear to be much:

What does this mean for the Braves?

Olivera will be paid approximately $33 million by Atlanta through 2020:

$2 million in 2015; Atlanta owes less than half.
$4 million in 2016
$6 million in 2017
$6.5 million in 2018
$7.5 million in 2019
$8.5 million in 2020

If Olivera undergoes Tommy John surgery at any point, a club option for 2021 is added for just $1 million.

The Braves have approximately $60 million in contract obligations for 2016. This assumes a few things like declining arbitration to Mike Minor and not being able to unload Chris Johnson in the next month. That leaves $50-60 million to spend this winter, per MLB's Mark Bowman. One would imagine John Hart and Co. will be highly active as they search for a catcher, left fielder and perhaps a veteran for the starting rotation.